Physical Therapy Interventions for Knee Pain Secondary to Osteoarthritis

Published: 18 November 2018| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/smfyg9255h.1
Contributor:
Tatyana Shamliyan

Description

This report is based on research conducted by the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) under contract to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Rockville, MD (Contract No. 290-2007-10064-I). Suggested citation: Shamliyan TA, Wang S-Y, Olson-Kellogg B, Kane RL. Physical Therapy Interventions for Knee Pain Secondary to Osteoarthritis. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 77. (Prepared by the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007- 10064-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 12(13)-EHC115-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; November 2012. www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/reports/final.cfm.

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Of 4,266 retrieved references, 154 eligible references examined the association between patient-centered and intermediate outcomes and 422 eligible references examined physical therapy interventions. Of these, 193 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reported on knee pain, disability, quality of life, and functional outcomes after physical therapy interventions. Pooling criteria were met by 84 RCTs that provided evidence for 12 physical therapy interventions on pain (n = 58), physical function (n = 36), and disability (n = 29). Most studies reported physical therapy effects at followups of 3 months or less. Evidence on longer-term physical therapy effects was available for seven intervention-outcome pairs.